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#PurposePioneerTalkShow Interview with Zulaika Patel

I dream for my generation to sit at the decision-making table and to design the kind of future that they want.”

#YouthWithPurpose

Welcome to The Purpose Pioneers Talk Show, where we interview influential, successful South African pioneers such as businesspeople, teachers, doctors, activists, artists, creatives, and change-makers to find out how they lead their lives with purpose! We at The Change Collective Africa truly believe that if you haven’t found your purpose as an individual or as a business now is the time to do so and hearing from others might give you the inspiration you need.

This particular interview is hosted by our vibrant Jess Tims. She interviews the legendary Zulaikha Patel: activist, woman’s right’s youth activist, writer, TedX speaker and BBC’s 100 Woman List 2016 about her purpose and critical issues facing SA’s youth that urgently need sustainable change.

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@zulaikhapatel_ talks to @thechangecollectiveafrica and @jessicatimslive about her Purpose, and critical issues facing SA’s youth that urgently need sustainable change.

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If you are a company or individual who would like to become a Purpose Pioneers Talk Show partner, we’d love to connect. To nominate a #PurposePioneer that you want us to interview on IGTV or this blog, contact us here.

Would you like to start a conversation that matters? Speak to us to become a partner, to share a big idea or to host your very own Cause Conversation at home. Visit the Table for 7, Cause Conversations website here

Follow Zulaikha’s journey here and here.

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How Melody Miya Became a #PurposePioneer

With a new norm upon us as a result of the Corona Virus, it’s become increasingly difficult to try be positive while being met with the realities of job losses, salary cuts and many more opportunities which have been put on pause.

But on the flip side, there’s Melody Miya, who has chosen to use his influence to help keep people positive and feeling hopeful despite the many setbacks that people are faced with. As the Founder of ConquerMIH, he has become one of the most influential South Africans to look out for this year, and it’s no surprise why.

Who is Melody Miya and what is he all about?

I’m a 28-year-old born in Katlehong. I spent half of my years in Durban before coming back to Johannesburg. I’m a bubbly, energetic and forward-thinking individual whose life story has been based on a vision to positively impact the world, to serve greatness and leave a great legacy. I’m a TV and radio personality at 947 and SABC 1’s Daily Thetha, a social entrepreneur, a master of ceremonies and creative mind.

Tell us about the journey of building ConquerMIH to where it is today.

I’ve always wanted to help people but was constantly reminded that I also need to pay my day-to-day bills. I started doing research on how I can help people and one thing I realised, was the influence I had which I could utilise in helping others. My love for motivational talks and work as an MC and Speaker, drove me to creating ConquerMIH. The money I made from the work I did, helped me start charity events for young kids. I particularly chose to focus on the children who difficulties reading and vowed to myself that I’d help them because I knew how far one’s knowledge, as a result of learning, can get them. Growing up, I had experienced the same challenges and had my father to assist me. And I wanted to do the same for other children as well.

The multiple projects we run as the ConquerMIH Foundation are there to bring solutions to those less fortunate than us. The relationships I have built over the years with multiple brands, have enabled me to help them be socially responsible and drive behaviour that looks into helping others or those less fortunate than themselves. As the ConquerMIH Foundation, we have the access to communities who need any form of assistance, and are able to join the two parties through a fruitful relationship of long term social sustainability.

What is your definition of purpose?

Purpose means living a life that lives to serve through ability. Playing your part in a team or someone life showcases you serving your purpose but also allowing your skills and abilities being a form relief to others alleviating strain, pain or discomfort.

What do you see as the cornerstone of your purpose?

My purpose is driven by opportunity – each opportunity experienced has granted me a chance to grow, learn, listen and showcase. In order for my purpose to be seen I need an opportunity or need to create one but vice versa, the opportunity always gives us something. I would love to see more young people being given an opportunity to be great, to experience, to evolve through the lessons. Encouraging kids to reach amplifies opportunities to be functional and have full opportunity in this world.

Who inspires you every day? And why?

My father, Mr Luckyboy Miya, who granted me an opportunity that wasn’t owed to me but he always went out of his way to help me become the best I can be. My dad has been unemployed for over 20 years, but his mentorship and guidance granted me an opportunity to attend great institutions of learning and to change my circumstances.

What has been your biggest achievement through your initiative?

The initiatives we run, namely, the Read-A-Sat and Conquer Games, are some of my greatest achievements. Through these, we were able to continuously impact the lives of young people since the organisation’s inception in 2015. Conquer MIH has also brought on opportunities for unemployed youth to get recruited for remunerated work. Despite it being seasonal, we’re always happy to see lives being transformed as a result of the amazing partnerships we have.

What are the biggest challenges you’ve experienced and how can people help fix them?

There have been multiple challenges faced throughout the years and most notably being consistent funding to run the initiatives. Funding that would be allocated to books, dictionaries, stipends, food, IT infrastructure and general event needs. People may help us by providing consistent assistance to bring each event to fruition and through long term sponsorship, to keep the programs running at the highest quality possible.

With the Corona Virus pandemic, how have you helped young people stay motivated and hopeful during this time?

At ConquerMIH Foundation, we have created online content to help the youth deal with mental health issues. We came up with the following platforms:

BhodlaTV; An Instagram hangout session where 100+ young people share their struggles and how they have survived, and bring experts to guide and advise every Friday and Saturday.

Bhodla TV Church; We created a Christian platform as a Christian to be encouraged as a young Christian by other believers which speaks largely to those who feel displaced and discouraged at this time.

HomeCell Groups, Every Monday evening, we have Zoom sessions with those who need mentorship and guidance in an intimate space.

What motivational words do you have for someone following in your footsteps?

Invest in yourself with everything you have. Your greatness will always start from within and never let temporary failure or delay, distract you from your goal. Let your opportunities find you ready and always have a teachable spirit because no man is an island. Most importantly, believe in yourself. Self doubt is a thief, don’t let it.

For more on Melody’s work, follow him on Twitter @MelodyMiyaVibe

Interview hosted by Nombulelo Fox for The Change Collective Africa.

Original Article

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Amonge Sinxoto – young, black and proud

To be young, black and proud

It’s no secret that South Africa has so many young activists looking to write their own narratives and ensure they put in the work to create a future that is inclusive and can address societal ills. One such person is Amonge Sinxoto, founder of Blackboard Africa. Her mission is to empower young people so that they too can be confident in their respective spaces and take charge of the problems affecting them on a daily basis.

Tell us about yourself and what you do?

I am Amonge Sinxoto and I’m a 19-year-old International Relations student, Activist, Speaker, Content Creator and most importantly, the Founder of Blackboard Africa.

What led you into social entrepreneurship and creating Blackboard Africa?

My experiences as a young black woman led me here. I started questioning certain parts of my identity while in high school and why my identity wasn’t celebrated. The fact that it was normal for black girls to be treated the way that they were, was such a wake-up call. And I could only imagine how many other black girls were going through the same thing. That journey helped me deep dive into understanding my blackness within the spaces that I was. I want to change that narrative not only for myself, but for other young people as well. Blackboard Africa helped make that a reality for me because it provided a platform where young people can have conversations about African identity and morph that into action through leadership. It was only when I attended the Social Entrepreneurship Forum in Ethiopia, that it opened the door to learning about making Blackboard Africa more sustainable from a business point of view.


With the current global pandemic that is racism, why are movements such as the Black Lives Matter movement particularly important?

Movements such as Black Lives Matter are important because they help people understand the need for change and that people need to start realising how important black lives are. We’ve had countless conversations on why black lives matter and that it’s not a trend. Aspects of our culture have been accepted and adopted because people find it cool globally, so why is it hard for people to acknowledge black lives? It’s appalling that we still have to fight for our place in the world. We are however grateful that movements like BLM have helped us expose all sorts of discrimination and prejudices and use that to emphasise the need for justice everywhere in the world. It’s even more inspiring to see many young people at the forefront of fighting racism.

Of the young people you’ve worked with, how common is the discrimination across this specific demographic?

It’s very common because everyone has a story. A story that speaks about the discrimination of one’s race and gender. I find it particularly scary that black women’s struggles specifically seem to be increasing and it’s also reflective in our society when you look at the many gender-based violence cases that we’re faced with daily as a country. I think that’s why it’s important for organisations such as Blackboard Africa to help young people open up about their experiences and work together to challenge structures and systems in order for drastic changes to be made.


What is the cornerstone of your purpose?

This journey has made me realise that I want to make things better for everyone. To help people realise their power to conquer whatever problem they’re facing. I also want to help shape experiences for the greater good and make young people feel proud of themselves, and ensure that they’re heard.

What leadership tools do you equip young people with to realise their potential?

We emphasise the need for self-development because this helps them find their purpose and identity. Once this has been established, we help with skills such as presentation skills, putting together strategies, and understanding principles of teamwork.


How can South Africans help combat the many social ills in society?

There’s no single solution, but rather multiple ways of eradicating these ills. We need to identify what these problems are and dissect them to focus on one particular issue surrounding whatever cause we’re trying to solve. Placing objectives with each problem also helps us put action behind them. For instance, Blackboard Africa has recognised the rise in gender-based violence cases, and to tackle this problem, we’ve identified the need to educate young boys on GBV so that they too can be allies and educate other boys about this problem. Find what you care about and focus on an area where you can best implement some form of action. If many people do this, the impact becomes greater.

What legacy do you hope to leave behind?

I hope to leave a legacy where young people can embrace their identity as a result of black pride or African pride in general. I want to see people unleashing their confidence to do better not just for themselves, but the communities they live in and the world as a whole. I want them to know how valuable their voices are.

To find out more about Blackboard Africa, visit www.blackboardafrica.com and on Instagram @blackboard_africa

Editor: Nombulelo Fox for The Change Collective Africa

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Meet the Minister of Menstruation: Candice Chirwa

Candice Chirwa, has become the voice of change in lifting the burden of menstruation for many girls in several South Africa communities. Known to many as the “Minister of Menstruation”, we caught up with her to find out more about her work as a social entrepreneur.

Purpose Pioneers: Tell us about yourself and what you do.

Candice Chirwa: I am Candice Chirwa and I’m 24 years old. I am a Menstruation activist (aka Minister of Menstruation), author, academic and Founder and Director of my NGO called Qrate.

PP: What led you to starting Qrate and choosing menstrual education as the focal point?

CC: While I was doing my Masters research, I found that a lot of young menstruators, when they first started menstruating, felt like they were going to die due to lack of education. To which Qrate was born and focused on enhancing the critical-thinking skills through the promotion of ‘Eduliftment’ – a tool to help young people apply critical-thinking skills in order to understand their circumstances and explore options open to them through educational content. I then took my love for Dramatic Arts and my academic research, and created these fun and dynamic menstruation workshops for the youth.

What is your definition of purpose?

CC: My definition of purpose is the “why” behind everything that you do. Our why is the purpose, the cause, or the belief that drives people’s passion in life. When we know the why to our life, then the path is very clear and it is very empowering. If you can’t figure out your purpose, then you must figure out your passion. Your passion will eventually lead you to your purpose. Looking at my own purpose, it is built on the foundation of wanting to educate and empower those around me. To utilise what I know and empower young girls so that gender inequality can be dismantled in hopes of building a better society for girls and women to live in.

PP: Who motivates you? And why?

CC: Eartha Kitt. When you read and learn about her wisdom, you cannot stop and be astounded at how she flourished through her career at such a young age when the world looked down at black women. She stood in her own truth and always spoke out against instances of injustice, which is a subject closely related to the work that I do.

PP: Your biggest achievement as an activist?

CC: Qrate won the Best Youth NGO award for 2019 at the Youth Achievers Award but the biggest achievement through the Menstruation Workshops is witnessing the confidence that young girls leave the workshops with after learning about Menstruation.

PP: What challenges have you faced amidst the current global pandemic as an NGO?

CC: Currently, the global pandemic is having an impact on the operational side of the organisation. There isn’t anything we can do until it is safe for social gatherings to happen. We are, however, trying to find a way to create content that is accessible for all.

PP: How are you helping the next generation be more aware of menstrual related issues?

CC: There’s a lot of power in empowering young people about their bodies. Many feel embarrassed to talk about puberty, sex and periods. By hosting these workshops, we create a safe space for young people to learn about periods but most importantly own their bodies. I’ve also realised that a lot of young adults still have a lot of questions and concerns about menstrual health. I create Menstruation Threads on Twitter as a way for people to engage on the topic. My recent collaboration with Lil Lets South Africa, through a platform called Lil-Lets Talk has enabled people to ask questions about periods and help normalise menstruation.

PP: Where do you foresee your work as an activist going in the future?

CC: I want to leave a legacy of having a generation of young people who do not feel afraid to speak openly about puberty, sex and menstruation. I want to leave a legacy behind where young people are able to make socially responsible choices for themselves because they are educated and uplifted.

For more information on these Menstrual Workshops or how you can get involved, follow Qrate on Twitter @Qrate_SA and Candice @Candice_Chirwa.

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Meet South African Artist Chris Soal

Chris Soal is an award-winning, emerging artist living and practicing in Johannesburg. Using unconventional found objects, such as toothpicks and bottle caps, in conjunction with concrete and other industrial materials, Soal negotiates structural impacts on urban living and reflects on ecological concerns. We recently caught up with him to find out about his perspective of purpose.

Purpose Pioneers: Tell us a little bit about what you do.
Chris Soal: I am an artist based in Johannesburg working predominately through sculpture and installation. My work uses unconventional found objects, such as toothpicks and bottle caps, in conjunction with concrete and other industrial materials. Through these materials I try to negotiate structural impacts on urban living and to reflect on ecological concerns, while considering the philosophical and psychological notion of the “self.”
My spatial approach to sculpture engages through a sensitivity to texture, light and form, expressed in an abstract minimalist language. While, conceptually, my works refer to the socio-political context of their making, highlighting the histories embedded in the found material, and utilising them in a way that challenges societal assumptions of value.

PP: What inspired you to start your career?

CS: I had numerous interests and inspirations growing up. My decision to study fine art was inspired by a gap-year I took after finishing high school to work in Surrey at a preparatory school as an assistant. This year was important for me as I travelled around Europe a lot. I think it wasn’t so much the art/architecture that I saw but rather an interaction with young professionals which changed my course. Instead of thinking of a career as a linear path, I met many successful young people who had studied one thing and found their niche as they walked their path. This led me to the conclusion that it didn’t matter so much what you studied but that you would find your way to where you were meant to be. I had prior interests in art and I thought that it would probably be the most difficult, enjoyable, and non-linear path I could start out on. I saw the path of the artist as freedom. And after returning back to South Africa to study, I wanted to see how far I could take it, and I think I’m still on that path.

PP: What advice would you give your 18-year old self?

CS: Inhabit every moment with as much presence as you can bring.
PP: What is your definition of Purpose?

CS: The driving force that enables you to override excuses, doubt and fear. It’s a resolution that gives a reason for action.

PP: What do you see as the cornerstone of YOUR purpose?
CS: My core beliefs. That life is worth living, celebrating and fighting for. That there is meaning to be found, and that I can be a part of encouraging someone else in this path.
PP: What has been the most pioneering / trailblazing moment in your career?

CS: Every moment I put a new work out into the world for the public to engage with. There’s nothing to hide behind in that moment. It’s the bride stripped bare in front of her bachelors (to reference Duchamp)
PP: What challenges are the youth of today facing? How can we fix this?

CS: The question of purpose that you posed earlier is a major one. The underlying structures that once supported existential meaning have been removed systematically from society over the last century and more (for better or worse), and yet no viable, communicable alternative has been provided to society at large. This leaves us in a state of limbo, with no definitive purpose to aim towards. I would encourage the youth to lean into this question personally, and not avoid it. Search for the answers that will give you purpose enough to live with intention.

PP: What specific skills do our next generation need to focus on and how do you think we can close that gap?

CS: I think in an age where almost every form of knowledge is accessible through the internet, the greatest asset or skill is focus. If our next generation can harness that ability to block out all the multiple distractions that present themselves, little will be out of reach. I think artists, designers and architects have a great opportunity here to create spaces that enable and allow for this.
PP: What values and principles are important to live by?

CS: This is territory where it’s difficult not to fall into cliché’s or redundancies, however treating others in the way in which you’d like to be treated is a good start. I think living from a centre of love and grace is the most we can strive for.

PP: How do you think people can live more meaningful and purpose-driven lives?

CS: There are many books of great length written on this and I can’t even begin to address it in such a short format. I don’t have a cheat code to this which can be summed up in a one-liner.
All I can recommend is to start with what is around you, the spaces and people that you can directly impact in the best way you can. It’s become a bit of an internet meme, but if you want to change the world, start by cleaning your room.

PP: Who is your role model and why?

CS: I have life, career, spiritual, and sporting role models, the list is too long to list here. My immediate community is full of individuals who have inspired and challenged me and I’m forever grateful for that. I’m also equally grateful for individuals from the past who were generous enough to share their knowledge and lives through books. Reading has always been a channel for me to reach real models that lifespans did not allow.
PP: What legacy do you hope to leave behind?

CS: A multifaceted one. But for starters, I’d like to inspire those around me through my art and life that nothing and no-one is insignificant, and that value resides in all things. Through my life I’d like to leave those who I engage with the better off for it. I’d like to build up and encourage as opposed to tear down.Original Article

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What Collaboration and Co-creation Looks Like

In the current climate, collaboration is even more important than ever before. It’s how we come up with completely unique and inventive solutions to some of the world’s most challenging social issues.

Just imagine a world where businesses and entrepreneurs go beyond the norm, where businesses co-create with their consumers, where competitors collaborate with each other, where organisations from completely different sectors come together to create a mutually valued and beneficial outcome for those most in need.

We believe that doing good is good business.

At The Change Collective Africa, one of our core values is collaboration. We envision making the world a better place by collaborating with Africa’s most talented minds to invent innovative solutions for equality and change. That’s why we connect a network of Purpose Pioneers across Africa to create real societal change where it is needed most. We are passionate about areas of data philanthropy, social entrepreneurship, gender equality, job creation and conscious consumerism.

In light of collaboration, here are four initiatives we are inspired by. Take a looksee!

Adidas and Allbirds

Brands Adidas and Allbirds partner to produce a zero-carbon mass market sports shoe. They’re committed to combining their talents and resources (collaborating!) to create the lowest carbon footprint performance shoe ever, with the ultimate goal of a net-zero product.

Tulu

Tulu offers apartment dwellers shared on-demand access to household items. Available in New York and Tel Aviv, TULU provides household items to those living in close quarters or without flexible budgets. Everyday products (from vacuums to Playstation consoles, screwdrivers, projectors, and more) are available on-demand, for use on an hourly basis, through a rental agreement established with the company and hosted in a storage room within your building. TULU occupies these spaces within apartment complexes or in neighborhood buildings to make the necessary goods far more accessible.

Emirates

Airline’s passengers listen to Crown Prince recite poetry. A collection of poems recited by Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed are now available for Emirates airline passengers to tune into while on board their flight. Travellers can listen to audio recordings of poems, penned by the Crown Prince of Dubai, as part of the airline’s push to bring Emirati heritage and culture to the world.

Google Arts and Culture

Google has launched a new tool that allows anyone with an internet connection to virtually monitor climate change at five of the world’s most precious cultural sites. Called “Heritage on the Edge,”, it uses 3D mapping to capture images of World Heritage Sites that can be used for conservation support and raising awareness with tourists and the general public. Among the five heritage sites that were mapped are Rapa Nui (Easter Island); Kilwa Kisiwani on Tanzania‘s Swahili Coast; the Old and New Towns of Edinburgh, Scotland; Mosque City of Bagerhat in Bangladesh; and the ancient city of Chan Chan in Peru.

If you know anything about The Change Collective Africa and Purpose Pioneers, you’ll know that collaboration is the essence of what we do, and ultimately, it was the springboard that inspired our initiative Table for 7, the Cause Conversations.

We invite seven guests, including disruptors, experts, leaders and change-makers and host Jessica Tims, connect to discuss and solve a key societal issue. It’s about collaboration and innovative problem solving while educating, raising awareness and creating actionable impact.

The conversations take place monthly via an online webinar live-streamed to Facebook Live and focuses on a specific cause each time. The dialogue between the 7 guests are honest, open and raw, where diverse opinions are encouraged. Sign up to join our next conversation.

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#PurposePioneerTalkShow Interview with Maps Maponyane

Leave people better, even if it’s just with a smile.

Welcome to The Purpose Pioneers Talk Show, where we interview influential, successful South African pioneers such as businesspeople, teachers, doctors, activists, artists, creatives, and change-makers to find out how they lead their lives with purpose! We at The Change Collective Africa truly believe that if you haven’t found your purpose as an individual or as a business now is the time to do so and hearing from others might give you the inspiration you need.

This particular interview is hosted by Jess Tims. She interviews Masego “Maps” Maponyane, South African television presenter, actor, fashion designer, speaker, model, creative consultant, voice over artist, philanthropist and business entrepreneur. Watch this incredibly in-depth interview as he gives us a reveal all on his story, his business and his reason for being.

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Watch this incredibly in-depth interview with the iconic Maps Maponyane from last week's #PurposePionner Talk Show as he gives us a reveal all on his story, his business and his reason for being.

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Did you know that you can nominate #PurposePioneers to be featured in live IGTV interviews and on our blog? If you are a purpose pioneer or know of someone who has a purpose worth hearing about, contact us here!

Or are you passionate about having purposeful conversations? Right here at #PurposePioneers you can download your very own toolkit and host your very own Cause Conversation at home. Click here to get started; receive a digital toolkit, or to get in touch!

Follow Maps’ journey here and here!

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#PurposePioneerTalkShow Interview with Paul Bushell

There's no such thing as perfect parenting.

Welcome to The Purpose Pioneers Talk Show, where we interview influential, successful South African pioneers such as businesspeople, teachers, doctors, activists, artists, creatives, and change-makers to find out how they lead their lives with purpose! We at The Change Collective Africa truly believe that if you haven’t found your purpose as an individual or as a business now is the time to do so and hearing from others might give you the inspiration you need.

This particular interview is hosted by Jess Tims. She interviews Paul Bushell, Durban-based psychologist, author and regular commentator on meaningful living, parenting and career development in a constantly changing world.

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For those that missed the Live interview on Thursday with Paul Bushell, Psychologist and Author, no worries you can watch it now. There were a lot of requests from parents to view and share, so now you can do just that, share the wisdom and spread the #kindness Wishing you all a wonderful weekend! #PurposePioneers #Kindness #CatalystsforChange #TheChangeCollective #Parenting #LearningAtHome

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Did you know that you can nominate #PurposePioneers to be featured in live IGTV interviews and on our blog? If you are a purpose pioneer or know of someone who has a purpose worth hearing about, contact us here!

Or are you passionate about having purposeful conversations? Right here at #PurposePioneers you can download your very own toolkit and host your very own Cause Conversation at home. Click here to get started; receive a digital toolkit, or even just to get in touch!

Follow Paul’s journey here and here!

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#PurposePioneerTalkShow Interview with Chelsea Firelily

My community needs me to be great.

Welcome to The Purpose Pioneers Talk Show, where we interview influential, successful South African pioneers such as businesspeople, teachers, doctors, activists, artists, creatives, and change-makers to find out how they lead their lives with purpose! We at The Change Collective Africa truly believe that if you haven’t found your purpose as an individual or as a business now is the time to do so and hearing from others might give you the inspiration you need.

This particular interview is hosted by Jess Tims. She interviews Chelsea ‘Firelily’ Goliath: poet, activist, and change maker about transcending racial stereotypes on the journey to our dreams and goals.

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@thechangecollectiveafrica and @jessicatimslive hear from @chelsea_firelily about transcending racial stereotypes on the journey to our dreams and goals

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Did you know that you can nominate #PurposePioneers to be featured in live IGTV interviews and on our blog? If you are a purpose pioneer or know of someone who has a purpose worth hearing about, contact us here!

Or are you passionate about having purposeful conversations? Right here at #PurposePioneers you can download your very own toolkit and host your very own Cause Conversation at home. Click here to get started; receive a digital toolkit, or to get in touch!

Follow Chelsea’s journey on Instagram @chelsea_firelily!

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#PurposePioneerTalkShow Interview with Nicole Capper

Do the things that set your soul on fire!

Welcome to The Purpose Pioneers Talk Show, where we interview influential, successful South African pioneers such as businesspeople, teachers, doctors, activists, artists, creatives, and change-makers to find out how they lead their lives with purpose! We at The Change Collective Africa truly believe that if you haven’t found your purpose as an individual or as a business now is the time to do so and hearing from others might give you the inspiration you need.

This particular interview is hosted by Jess Tims. She interviews TV Presenter Nicole Capper in an honest, real and profound interview, reflecting on finding Purpose during challenging times.

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For those that missed the live interview, you have an opportunity to watch the honest, real and profound interview with our host Jessica Tims and the vibrant Nicole Capper. Enjoy! #PurposePioneers

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Did you know that you can nominate #PurposePioneers to be featured in live IGTV interviews and on our blog? If you are a purpose pioneer or know of someone who has a purpose worth hearing about, contact us here!

Or are you passionate about having purposeful conversations? Right here at #PurposePioneers you can download your very own toolkit and host your very own Cause Conversation at home. Click here to get started; receive a digital toolkit, or to get in touch!

Follow Nicole’s journey here and here.

Original Article